Social Seniors: 9 of the Best Clubs for Seniors to Join

 

 

As the baby boomer population ages, it may not be as easy to connect with other people. Health issues, accessibility and motivation can all keep us from enjoying life the way we’d like. Joining a club or group can help. When it comes to clubs for seniors, they’re a dime a dozen. Here are a few you should definitely check out.

Senior Centers

Senior centers are much more than resources! They’re really amazing spaces to find activities, friends and more. Senior centers vary in what they offer, so always check with the one closest to you. Many senior centers offer courses on using computers, hobbies and languages. They may also host dances as well as mixers to meet other seniors in your area. You can take fitness classes together or even go on field trips! You can find recommendations for elderly care services there as well.

Travel Clubs

Traveling with other seniors is a really great bonding experience. There’s something so freeing about traveling either domestically or abroad that brings people together. It also keeps you active while you enjoy once-in-a-lifetime experiences. Senior travel groups often provide guided tours of different areas depending on the location you choose. Group travel winds up being relatively cheap compared to traveling on your own, too.

 

 

Senior Corps

Through Senior Corps, you can volunteer and give back your time alongside 220,000 other seniors. People over 55 can volunteer to help with things as simple as providing transportation for someone to get to the doctor or giving family caregivers a break before they’ve organized assisted home health. Seniors can also volunteer to rebuild after disasters and focus on environmental concerns.

Sports Clubs

From tennis to softball to bowling, sports clubs can connect you to senior sports leagues. Being physical and exercising are two major benefits to participating in sports. Seniors who spent two hours a week practicing soccer had improved oxygen levels. Other sports like golf can improve concentration, problem solving skills and limit the hold dementia can have on someone. Being on a team and having a scheduled time to be together can help limit a person’s likelihood to experience depression and anxiety. It can also motivate people to work towards goals.

Book Club

Reading is so much better for us than we often realize. It can improve brain function, sleep and stress levels. When people get together to discuss books, those benefits multiply. Seniors who get together to critically discuss books have fewer dementia symptoms and improved memory skills. Meeting on a schedule and knowing that you need to read certain parts of a book by a certain date can also keep seniors organized and social.

Knitting Club

Knitting has some very real health benefits. Any kind of crafting helps keep our brains engaged and youthful. This reduces cognitive impairments by up to 50 percent! Knitting several times per week can help lower stress levels and improve a person’s mood. Bringing knitters together into a club or group pushes away loneliness while improving the self-esteem of everyone involved. Another benefit is what you do with what you knit. Many groups come together to knit items for children, especially hats and blankets for babies in a neonatal intensive care unit. Donating the product of your time while improving your own health just increases the many emotional benefits seniors can reap from knitting.

Red Hat Society

Sorry guys, the Red Hat Society is for women only! This group calls itself a playgroup for women. While younger women can join, only those aged 50 and above get to wear the coveted red hats and purple clothing that the group is known for. These women gather online or in-person during local meetings to have fun and support each other. The society reaches across the world and has received awards. It’s even inspired a musical, HATS! in 2006.

The basis for the Red Hat Society was a friend of the founder who had a birthday. The founder gave the friend a red hat along with a poem that encouraged aging women to have fun and be themselves.

 

Continuing Education Groups

Some institutions of higher learning have continuing education groups. Many seniors live near an institution that allows them to participate in courses as they age. Some provide even more ways for seniors engaged in learning to socialize and spend time together.

Waukesha County Technical College in Wisconsin provides a Learning in Retirement (LIR) community. This keeps seniors in touch with each other while offering them unique experiences and learning opportunities. Featured speakers, field trips, concerts and plays are all a part of what makes the LIR a great community. Make sure to check with a learning institution near you on the availability of their courses.

Social Networking

One of the biggest benefits to the modern era is the ability to keep up with friends and family, regardless of where they live. Social media allows seniors to see new photos of their grandchildren each day, reconnect with friends from high school and stay on top of local and international news.

Stitch, a new social network, provides their site only to seniors. Sometimes it’s nice to have our own corner of the internet to connect with our peers. They want to cut down on the loneliness many feel as they age, especially if seniors’ only in-person connection is their assisted home health aide. You can make new friends and even date other seniors you meet through the site and associated in-person groups.

Make sure to check around your local senior center for more club ideas in your area.

 

 

Social Games

You can also join our Clint memory games program, and be able to play remotely and meet new friends! You’ll compete with them on playful memory games: trivia quiz, Intruders, Sudoku…

 

 

 

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Memory games adapted for all

Memory games adapted for all